Last week, I talked with Chris Holland on the Film Festival Secrets podcast about what 3 things a producer should consider when choosing a distribution path for a film. I say producer because typically this is a job under their purview…but many times microbudget filmmakers are their own producers (and writer and director and editor). This podcast was recorded in preparation of my upcoming webinar on film distribution hosted by Atlanta Film Festival. I wanted to give everyone a taste of what the hour will cover..it will cover A LOT!

questions about film distribution path

You can listen to the audio of our discussion HERE…or you can read the abbreviation below:

Question #1 Is there a market for this film? What elements does my film need to have in order to get a meaningful release?

There is so much information available online these days that speaks to what is selling. There are a myriad of case studies on various types of films and how they were distributed.  A producer needs to be curious about distribution prospects BEFORE getting into production. As I stated in my last blog piece (point #4), if after speaking to industry representatives, you find the film you are hoping to make doesn’t appeal to the industry, you will most likely encounter challenges in the market.

Question #2 Do I have the means to distribute directly?

Since significant distribution deals are rare compared to the amount of films being produced, have you planned for self distribution? How much does that cost? What avenues will be open to your film? Are there barriers to entry on platforms like iTunes, Amazon, cable VOD, Vimeo? We’ll talk about all of this during the session.

Question #3 How to structure the release?

The mantra “Every film is different” couldn’t be more true in the world of independent film. There is NO ROADMAP to success mainly because success doesn’t look the same to every production. Does a film need  a theatrical release? Is day and date the right strategy? Should a film go straight to digital platforms? What about broadcast and educational markets? What part do film festivals play in a release strategy? I will talk about all of this including companies to vet and  what the repercussions are in deciding on the strategy for your film. Yes, in each choice there are trade-offs and you have to be comfortable with that. But there are also instances where rearranging the release window can actually work in your favor, despite the common opinion that windowing patterns must be closely followed.

From experience, I know that many of you attend markets and panels where a lot of talk happens and you walk away almost more confused than when you went in. I hope to take some of that confusion away with this session. The final half hour will be devoted to answering your specific questions so be prepared.

To sign up for the session, visit this LINK

Sheri Candler

 

Successful crowdfunding means personal connection

April 1, 2013
posted by sheric

It makes sense doesn’t it? Word of mouth doesn’t travel without a personal network of supporters, however small. For some reason, there is a misconception that free money just rolls in when a crowdfunding initiative is launched, despite the fact that there are many, many case studies available online (for FREE) from people who ran successful campaigns and report that it was very difficult work. Widening the audience is one benefit of a campaign, but you have to start from somewhere in order to widen out.

In a short clip I did with Film Courage, I talk about why crowdfunding may not be for everyone and the limitations one will encounter if not very active online.

An aspect of a crowdfunding campaign that isn’t as apparent as money, is building up a sizable contact list of engaged supporters. I can’t tell you how crucial this is not just to the one project, but to ALL of your future as a filmmaker. Developing and maintaining a database of personal contact details is invaluable because they have given permission (and expressed an interest in) for future communication from you. This list should be guarded with your life and not relinquished to any third party! It shows the trust people have put in your talent and in you as a person, a trust difficult to gain that can easily be destroyed. This list should never been taken lightly or sold/given away for short term gain (besides, it goes against CAN SPAM Act regulations unless each recipient has been given clear and conspicuous notice that his or her e-mail address will be shared with third parties for marketing purposes. Who would agree to that?).

While there are certainly companies and individuals asking to be hired to crowdfund for artists, I think skipping over the crucial step of putting in the personal work it takes to gain trust is missing by employing this tactic exclusively. Social media channels are truly a gift and an opportunity we have been given to get closer to our audience, to have a deeper and more personal connection through our work. It breeds loyalty, instead of disposability. Also, the ability to know that our work touches people and matters to people can keep you going when it seems the world is full of rejection or self doubt. Gathering a team to help is advisable (in all aspects of filmmaking), but allowing only the team (or worse, an uninvolved 3rd party) to have contact with your supporters is a mistake.

It is time that artists come to terms with the fact that the age of the bubble (where creation takes place only in private) has come to an end. The audience wants to feel close to the art and its creator. This isn’t new really, fan clubs have existed for decades, but now that closeness comes in Tweets, Facebook posts, blog posts, podcasts, videos, Pinterest boards  etc. and the ability to have a dialog directly. Make an effort personally to reach out to your audience, even get to know them by name, and you will see that effort come back to you in artistically, financially and personally beneficial ways.

 

TFC Tidbit of the Day 45 Case studies

August 20, 2010
posted by sheric

Here are a few links to some of my favorite crowdfunding case studies. These will give you more ideas on what others did successfully and how they felt about the experience.

King is a Fink http://bit.ly/aUVCqi;  Gary King http://bit.ly/9unWbp; Jacques Thelemaque http://bit.ly/9UyA5o; Coffee and Celluloid http://bit.ly/d3HXgD; @craigmod http://bit.ly/d55B0I ; John Trigonis http://bit.ly/buz4bA